Coastal Waves | New & Old

Today I’m featuring the same scene as shot by two very different cameras.  As you can see, the light was simply gorgeous in the late afternoon on Veterans’ Day at Perkins Cove in Ogunquit. The image above was taken with my uncle’s beloved Hasselblad camera, dating back to somewhere in the 1950s or 1960s.  This medium format camera is the dream of many photographers, and I’m lucky and thankful to have the opportunity to use it.  This image was one of my favorites from the first roll of color film I had developed – using one of the lovely Carl Zeiss lenses I’ve been shooting with and writing about lately.  Below, you can see another wave in the afternoon light as shot with my modern day dream of a digital camera, the Canon 5d Mark II.  It’s incredible what advancements can take place in technology, and despite all this – some people still prefer to stick to the tried and true….although at this point I think it’s safe to say that the majority of photographers are shooting on digital cameras. Now, if I could only get my hands on a digital Hasselblad!

Happy Thanksgiving to all!  Thanks for visiting, I always appreciate your feedback and support.  I’ve got an incredible amount to be thankful for this year, a wonderful family & new fiance, a great audience & community, and many milestones I’ve been thrilled and appreciative to record over the past year.  Cheers to all & I hope you have a great day filled with thanks for all the things big & small that fill your days.

The Marginal Way | Ogunquit, Maine

On a Veterans Day visit to Perkins Cove and the Marginal Way in Ogunquit, Maine, my brother and I were greeted with some fierce ocean waves and gorgeous sunlight.  The waves were so big in fact, that when I set up my tripod in the parking lot, as I was framing a shot with my eye in the viewfinder – I was actually soaked with the spray from the waves hitting the rock wall.  (Yes, soaked…so badly in fact that a couple walking by offered to get paper towels from their car to save my camera!)

The scenery didn’t lend itself to HDR imagery with the churning of the ocean, but the late day sunlight was so rich in color that I kept shooting and shooting with all the variety in the textures of the water and the coastline.  Plenty of shots from this trip…hope to get back during sunrise some day to catch the gorgeous morning sunlight as it reaches the east coast.

The Worker | Carly A. Turecamo


I’m always afraid to overdo any particular subject here at The Daily Portsmouth.   Sometimes, I can’t help myself…in the late afternoon recently I had the chance to stroll down Ceres Street and the lighting was just awesome.   It’s been an appropriate amount of time since the last tugboat photo – so even though I overdo the tugs (nobody seems to mind too much), I thought I’d share a new take on the workers. The Moran Towing tugboats are serious pieces of machinery, and they’ve gotten busy again with the arrival of fall and freighters unloading sand and salt. I love the grittiness of the shot and the textures that seem to pop off of the frame, highlighting the ruggedness of the vessel. I think it’s a nice change from the usual sunset/waterfront shots that usually feature them.

At Wagon Hill | Durham, NH

Driving along Route 4 in Durham, NH you’re likely to see one of the town’s landmarks….a wagon situated atop the hill of the appropriately named Wagon Hill Farm.  I’ve always loved the decidedly New England feel to the landscape and wanted to see what I could capture with the Zeiss 50mm Hasselblad lens.  It creates rich textures and soft silky backgrounds….neither of which are too exaggerated here, but I’ll feature more shots that came out well from the quick visit.

Autumn Visitors | Cynthia Pioneer

Along with the fall comes cooler weather, falling leaves and a need for sand and salt.  Recently the Cynthia Pioneer returned to the Granite State Minerals terminal in downtown Portsmouth to unload some materials for the imminent inclement weather. While I’m not quite ready for snowstorms and ice, I’m enjoying the cool mornings and the increase in river traffic.  I’m sure I’m not the only one – time to get the skis ready for the season (or book the plane tickets to Florida if you’re not a winter person…).

Chronicles of the Martingale Wharf

In today’s post we’ll feature two recent shots of the Martingale Wharf, the long awaited construction project currently underway on Bow Street on Portsmouth’s waterfront.  The building is finally getting its skin, with bricks being installed on the Bow Street facade…along with new windows and more inside that I can’t really see.  The good news is that we might actually have a streetscape on Bow St. like we used to in days gone by….a win for both locals and tourists.  I really dig the shot above – it feels very natural and realistic all at the same time.  Taken with the Zeiss Hasselblad 100mm….it seems to call out textures and lighting on objects that just seem to fall flat with other lenses (or maybe I’m just a bit crazy).  Below, the front of the building gets its new brick skin…

Halloween in Portsmouth

Portsmouth is a cool place during October.  In addition to the New Hampshire Film Festival, Portsmouth also hosts Scarecrows of the Port (awesome scarecrows posted around downtown…my favorite is above Jumpin’ Jay’s this year…and will be featured next week)….including the little guy seen here hanging from the clock at 49 Market Street (donated by Summerwind Jewelers).  This shot was taken with my Carl Zeiss 100mm Hasselblad lens, with some beautiful clarity on the clock…falling off in the background to a nice soft view of the Athenaeum building and the North Church.

In addition to today’s photo – you MUST head over to my Flickr gallery HERE in order to check out more shots from the 10th Annual New Hampshire Film Festival.