Book & Bar

One of the more interesting additions to Portsmouth’s dining options this past year has been the Book & Bar in the Custom House on Pleasant Street.  I highly suggest you check it out – great ambiance complete with used books, coffee, food, beverage…as you’d expect with a name like “Book & Bar”.  They did a great job restoring the interior and maintaining the character of the structure – great beams, high ceilings, fireplaces, etc.

I’ve been planning to begin shooting a few new series this year, and I think this shot will fit perfectly into one of them.  Stay tuned – I’m looking forward to sharing more in the months ahead!

Mary M. Coppedge | Tugboats of Portsmouth

 

The Mary M. Coppedge stands tall in front of the Martingale Wharf building and the construction of the new Memorial Bridge. I love this time of day when the orange lights that adorn the sides of the tugs take on an eerie glow – in this shot they nearly match the orange glow of the homes in the building on the waterfront in the background.

 

Rye Harbor Boats

Continuing with this week’s images with another from my time in Rye on Saturday.  These dinghies sat roped and blowing around in the wind at Rye Harbor.  There is something I’ve always loved about images like this one, dinghies at rest in a body of water.  I’ve seen many similar shots over the years, some more colorful with richly painted boats, others with a single dinghy in the middle of a foggy scene, but I tried to get as close to directly above the boats as I could (without falling in) for this image to get a different feel.  The ruggedness of these particular boats adds an element, as well as the bright orange Home Depot bucket.

The Sunken Forest of Rye

With this winter’s intense storms along the New Hampshire coastline, the storied Sunken Forest of Rye has once again become visible.  These trees used to be massive in diameter, and have been carbon dated to between 3,400 and 3,800 years old.  I can only imagine what this part of the world looked like back then, when land may have stretched out to the Isles of Shoals in the distance. I found some interesting information on Wikipedia here, and a quick google search will bring up others’ articles from past times they’ve become visible.

Along the Kittery Waterfront

 

With all the activity on the Portsmouth side of the Piscataqua, sometimes I forget how interesting Kittery’s waterfront is.  These lobster boats sit resting and ready for the next day’s activity at the end of the afternoon.  Be sure to click this image to enjoy it at full size.

 

Changes on The Waterfront

 

These images of the waterfront were taken almost exactly one year apart.  As you’ve seen recently here, the Memorial Bridge reconstruction continues to gain momentum – but sometimes it’s the context of the progress that we need to take a step back and appreciate.  The same goes for the continued development and re-development in Portsmouth, which I hope to begin to feature in similar comparisons.

Thankfully – this view is always graced with the last rays of sunlight each day on the Kittery shorefront in the distance.  The photo from 2013 has a soft subtle red glow in the background, illuminating the lobstering boats docked in the distance.